Valerian Root (Valeriana officinalis)

$6.00

Valerian is an herb. It is native to Europe and parts of Asia but also grows in North America. Medicine is made from the root.

Valerian is most commonly used for sleep disorders, especially the inability to sleep (insomnia). Valerian is also used orally for anxiety and psychological stress.

Valerian seems to act like a sedative on the brain and nervous system

Description

Possibly Effective for
Inability to sleep (insomnia). Although some conflicting research exists, most studies show that taking valerian can reduce the amount of time it takes to fall asleep by about 15 to 20 minutes. Valerian also seems to improve sleep quality. Doses of 400-900 mg of valerian extract taken up to 2 hours before bed seem to work best. Continuous use for several days, even up to four weeks, may be needed before an effect is noticeable. Some studies show that valerian can help improve sleep when combined with other herbs, including hops and lemon balm. Taking valerian might also improve the sleep quality of people who are withdrawing from the use of sleeping pills. However, some research suggests that valerian does not relieve insomnia as fast as “sleeping pills.”

Menopausal symptoms. Research shows that taking 675-1060 mg of valerian root daily for 8 weeks can reduce the severity and frequency of hot flashes in postmenopausal women.
Insufficient Evidence for
Psychiatric side effects due to medications for HIV. Efavirenz is a medication that is used to treat HIV infection. People taking efavirenz may experience psychiatric side effects. Early research shows that taking valerian root every night for 4 weeks can improve sleep quality and anxiety in people taking efavirenz. But it doesn’t seem to prevent psychosis or thoughts of suicide.

Anxiety. There is contradictory evidence about the effectiveness of valerian for anxiety. Some early research shows that taking valerian may reduce anxiety. However, other studies have shown no effect. The conflicting results may be due to differences in doses used or the type/severity of anxiety being treated.
Depression. Early research suggests that taking valerian plus St. John’s wort improves symptoms of depression. Taking higher doses of valerian (1000 mg) with St. John’s wort improves depression symptoms faster than low doses (500 mg).
Menstrual disorders (dysmenorrhea). Early research suggests that taking 255 mg of valerian three times daily for two menstrual cycles reduces pain and the need for other pain relievers during menstruation.

Possibly Effective for
Inability to sleep (insomnia). Although some conflicting research exists, most studies show that taking valerian can reduce the amount of time it takes to fall asleep by about 15 to 20 minutes. Valerian also seems to improve sleep quality. Doses of 400-900 mg of valerian extract taken up to 2 hours before bed seem to work best. Continuous use for several days, even up to four weeks, may be needed before an effect is noticeable. Some studies show that valerian can help improve sleep when combined with other herbs, including hops and lemon balm. Taking valerian might also improve the sleep quality of people who are withdrawing from the use of sleeping pills. However, some research suggests that valerian does not relieve insomnia as fast as “sleeping pills.”
Menopausal symptoms. Research shows that taking 675-1060 mg of valerian root daily for 8 weeks can reduce the severity and frequency of hot flashes in postmenopausal women.
Insufficient Evidence for
Psychiatric side effects due to medications for HIV. Efavirenz is a medication that is used to treat HIV infection. People taking efavirenz may experience psychiatric side effects. Early research shows that taking valerian root every night for 4 weeks can improve sleep quality and anxiety in people taking efavirenz. But it doesn’t seem to prevent psychosis or thoughts of suicide.
Anxiety. There is contradictory evidence about the effectiveness of valerian for anxiety. Some early research shows that taking valerian may reduce anxiety. However, other studies have shown no effect. The conflicting results may be due to differences in doses used or the type/severity of anxiety being treated.
Depression. Early research suggests that taking valerian plus St. John’s wort improves symptoms of depression. Taking higher doses of valerian (1000 mg) with St. John’s wort improves depression symptoms faster than low doses (500 mg).
Menstrual disorders (dysmenorrhea). Early research suggests that taking 255 mg of valerian three times daily for two menstrual cycles reduces pain and the need for other pain relievers during menstruation.
Premenstrual disorders (PMS). Taking valerian root extract seems to reduce the emotional, behavioral, and physical symptoms associated with PMS when started on the 21st day of the menstrual cycle and continued for 7 days.
Restlessness. Early research suggests that taking one or two tablets of a specific combination product, providing 160 mg of valerian root extract and 80 mg of lemon balm leaf extract once or twice daily might reduce symptoms of serious restlessness (dyssomnia) in children under the age of 12.
Stress. Early research suggests that taking 600 mg of valerian for 7 days before a mental stress test reduces blood pressure, heart rate, and feelings of pressure when under stress. Other research found that taking 100 mg of valerian before speaking in front of an audience reduces feelings of anxiety. Another study found that taking a single dose of a combination product containing 360 mg of valerian and 240 mg of lemon balm night lower anxiety caused by stress. But the combination seems to increase anxiety when taken in larger doses of 1080 mg of valerian and 720 mg of lemon balm.

Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).
Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS).
Convulsions.
Epilepsy.
Headache.
Menopausal symptoms including hot flashes and anxiety.
Mild tremors.
Muscle and joint pain.
Stomach upset.

Reviews

There are no reviews yet.

Be the first to review “Valerian Root (Valeriana officinalis)”

Your email address will not be published.